Describe the 'Disability of Discrimination Act 1995' and give a simple example of what a student working with IT in a school/college should ...?Describe the 'Disability of Discrimination Act...

Describe the 'Disability of Discrimination Act 1995' and give a simple example of what a student working with IT in a school/college should ...?

Describe the 'Disability of Discrimination Act 1995' and give a simple example of what a student working with IT in a school/college should look out for?

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herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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The DDA 95 is an 8-part document legislated in the United Kingdom which is the equivalent to the American ADA/IDEA Acts which watch and safeguard the rights of individuals with any physical or mental disability from becoming discriminated in

Employment (Part II), specifically for job opportunities, comments or bullying from others or from enforcement (situational discrimination)

Other persons particularly co-workers, union,guilds, trade organizations, or lawmakers who are unwilling to make changes for people with disabilities.

Premises-Locations with barriers of movement for people with disabilities (these would have to be modified for disabled individuals)

Occupational Pension schemes- There are some organizations that, in order to get rid of people with disabilities would scheme some negotiation of some form in the shape of early retirements, etc. which is an illegal thing to do, because you are preventing the individual with disability from having the same opportunities as others.

Part III of the DDA prevents discrimination in additional premises such as goods and services.

Part IV prevents discrimination in educational institutions, Part V prevents it with systems of transportation, and Part VI establishes the official National Disability Council.

A student in an IT program must understand that differentiation and accommodations are a requirement in a learning institution, and any student with disability who enters a room has the same academic and social opportunity to succeed in a college as a student who is not disabled.

However, the non-disabled student will have to understand that the professor and other colleagues will have to be a part of the accommodation process , either by physically locating themselves somewhere in the room where the individual with disabilities can make the most out of the learning, or being peer assistants to the student, or expecting for changes in the class schedule or format.

These are not problems, however, but signs of social change and of the importance to bring out the full potential of every student. This is also a window into the diversity that is to be encountered in the college arena, and in life itself.

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