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Analyze the effects of the crisis of the third century in the Roman Empire.

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The Crisis of the Third Century in the Roman Empire lasted fifty years, from the death of Severus Alexander to the accession of Diocletian. Rome was near collapse in all spheres: social, political, military, and economic. There was anarchy, rebellions, and the violent deaths of rulers.

The causes of the crisis provide some insight into the outcome. One of the main causes of the crisis was was the absence of a clear means of succession, sometimes referred to as the "constitutional problem." Would succession be patrilineal? Would the reigning emperor choose? Would the Senate elect the ruler? Would he be selected by the Praetorian Guard? A second cause was the absence of an efficient provincial administration. Rome was a "federation of cities,” with the curia run by the aristocracy. The imperial government stepped in to fill the void, which sapped its resources. The state responded by increasing taxes, which led to popular discontent.

Severus Alexander sought a negotiated truce with...

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