Describe Boxer's character and personality. How do the pigs treat Boxer?

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In Orwell's allegory about the rise of totalitarianism, Boxer is representative of industrial and agricultural workers who were exploited by the capitalist class. He is originally used for his strength and size by Farmer Jones. After the revolution, encouraged by Old Major (Marx or Lenin), Boxer becomes one of...

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In Orwell's allegory about the rise of totalitarianism, Boxer is representative of industrial and agricultural workers who were exploited by the capitalist class. He is originally used for his strength and size by Farmer Jones. After the revolution, encouraged by Old Major (Marx or Lenin), Boxer becomes one of the most important animals on the farm because of his brute force and his valor during the Battle of the Windmill. While kind and soft spoken, Boxer is also tremendously loyal to the pigs who take over the day to day running of the farm. Unfortunately, Boxer is not very smart, and he never quite figures out that the pigs are taking advantage of his work. Throughout the novel, the donkey Benjamin complains and warns Boxer against the tactics of the pigs, yet Boxer will only reply by saying he will "work harder." His work and loyalty to the cause is an inspiration to the other animals on the farm.

Throughout the novel, Boxer is committed to making the farm successful and will not take a day off from rebuilding the windmill, even after he is crippled with a split hoof. When Boxer becomes physically unable to do the heavy work anymore, the pigs assure him that he will be taken care of, and Boxer appears to be looking forward to retirement and spending "peaceful days...in the corner of the big pasture."

The pigs claim they will send Boxer to the hospital in Willingdon where he could be treated "more satisfactorily than can be done on the farm." On the day that he is to go off to the hospital, a van shows up on the farm. Only Benjamin realizes what is happening when he reads the side of the van, which says, "Alfred Simmonds, Horse Slaughterer and Glue Boiler in Willingdon. Dealer in Hides and Bone Meal. Kennels Supplied." In the end, then, the pigs sell Boxer to the knacker so they can buy alcohol. It is a great betrayal of the hardest worker on the farm. It is representative of the Stalinist purges in the Soviet Union when farmers and workers died by the millions because of the communist government's policies.

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Boxer is a massive horse who is the strongest, most dependable animal on the farm. After hearing about Animalism, Boxer becomes its biggest supporter and plays an important role in the Battle of Cowshed. Boxer's tireless work ethic is a major reason for the farm's success. He even wakes up early to begin working and selflessly puts the farm's best interests before his well-being. Despite his strength and usefulness, Boxer is extremely unintelligent. He cannot remember the alphabet after the letter D, and is naive to Napoleon's tyranny. His answer to every problem is "I will work harder," and Boxer believes everything that Napoleon says. The pigs take advantage of Boxer's loyalty and strength by overworking him and cutting his food rations. They view Boxer as simply a tool who they send away to die when he is no longer useful. Boxer's character is symbolic of the male working class and Russian peasants. 

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