Describe the setting of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men (time and place).  

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noahvox2 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men has as its setting the countryside towards the west coast of California. The book opens near the town of Soledad, which is located between Los Angeles and San Jose. George and Lennie have fled from Weed, California, some 400 miles north of Soledad.

George and Lennie make their way to a barley farm near Soledad to work. Much of the rest of the book takes place there at the farm in the bunk house, which is "a long, rectangular building" with "whitewashed" walls and an "unpainted" floor. The bunk house has a number of places for simple beds, a stove, and a card table.

Of course, the farm has other buildings, such as the main house, a barn, and the room of Crooks the stable buck. His bed seems to be a manger ("a long box filled with straw"). This neat and tidy room is connected to the barn. Chapter 4 has Crooks' room as its setting.

In Chapter 5, the chapter in which Lennie accidentally kills Curley's wife, the action is set in the farm's barn.

The book's final chapter returns to the setting at the opening of the book, as this George finds Lennie hiding in the brush near the Salinas River, just as George had told him to do at the first of the book.

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