define the term social valorisation and explain how this relates to promoting the independence of older people

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durbanville | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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It is important in the fast-paced environment in which we live, to take time out to appreciate "real" life. Social (Role) Valorization (SRV) is an approach that encourages those people who feel marginalized (in the case of older people very confusing technology is stress-inducing and intimidating) or even people who feel undervalued to reconnect and establish worthwhile relationships.

 Formulated in 1983 by Wolf Wolfensberger, PhD, Social Role Valorization, attempts to create and encourage interaction on social levels and to ensure that people (in this case, older people) have a sense of belonging, are sufficiently educated, and sufficiently enabled, especially within the community.

Monetary and medical concerns are always prominent in discussions about older people and, often the psychological and social impact of ageing are overlooked. Older persons lose friends and spouses and re-establishment of new relationships at this late stage is often difficult. Social Role Valorization strives to avoid this problem.

Older persons,

because of physical vulnerability and personal isolation, are robbed more often than members of other age groups

and they are equally susceptible to fraudsters offering to invest money and provide huge returns.

It is a well-known fact that, from a psychological perspective, the more valued a person feels, the more his or her contribution to society and his or her ability to cope and manage more independently. It is essential for older persons to have groups to attend and to be able to participate. With a capacity for giving advice, more effort should be made to allow older persons to share their lifelong experiences which in turn could help encumbered, younger persons to appreciate their own contributions. Society is enriched and older persons are empowered.   

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