According to the Declaration of Independence, ultimately why is it okay to separate from England?

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mperez-mugg21 | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

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In the Declaration of Independence, the thirteen colonies argued that people have certain inalienable rights including "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" and that governments are formed in order allow people to secure these rights. They argue that whenever a government fails to protect these rights or infringes upon them, it is the right of the people to rise up and overthrow that government. The thirteen colonies argue that George III, the king of Great Britain, has repeatedly infringed upon the colonists' rights.  Further, the the colonists note that they have repeatedly tried to bring their grievances before the king in order to change their situation, but have been unsuccessful. They argue that as a result of these repeated grievances and George III's unwillingness to address them, they are justified in overthrowing his rule and declaring their own government.

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