debate Ghanaian society cannot advance without a conscious effort to rid itself of major ills like,bribery ,corruption,illiteracy ,superstition,greed,nepotism,sectarianism,debate.

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

I  must agree with #2 - the list of problems presented is not unique to Ghana. There are many First World countries in existence today that have had and continue to exhibit some of these poisonous interrelationships. The presence of such situations does not necessarily result in the collapse or ceasing to advance of a country or government.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

I would actually say the most destructive thing on that list is illiteracy. If the common people cannot read, they cannot inform themselves and so cannot make decisions without someone telling them what to think. The most valuable part of a free society is freedom to learn and educate one's self.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

All of these things are destructive to society.  The main reason is because they inhibit the functioning of government.  When government cannot function cleanly, without disruption, people cannot go about their daily lives.  You can’t start or run a business, own a house or pursue any of the other dreams of an organized society.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

This does not seem to be a topic about which there would be much to debate, with the exception of the last item in the series, which is "debate." Why would any society want to rid itself of debate, which is not an ill, and which is, in fact, a force for good?

As I view American politics and society today, it seems to me that we have all the same ills as are listed in this comment about Ghana, and the statement seems likely to apply to many societies around the world.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team

We’ll help your grades soar

Start your 48-hour free trial and unlock all the summaries, Q&A, and analyses you need to get better grades now.

  • 30,000+ book summaries
  • 20% study tools discount
  • Ad-free content
  • PDF downloads
  • 300,000+ answers
  • 5-star customer support
Start your 48-Hour Free Trial