In "Death, be not proud," how do paradox and personification contribute to the sense of a victory over death?  

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"Death, be not proud" by John Donne is among his Holy Sonnets and should be read in the context of Christian theology concerning death. In this context, human death and mortality are consequences of original sin. Our death, however, is only physical. Within Donne's theological tradition, the human soul is immortal, and will, after the Last Judgement, be given eternal joy in Heaven or eternal torment in Hell. The Apocalypse and Last Judgement mark an end to human mortality, and thus the "death" of death; after this point, all humans shall exist as immortal souls in a purely spiritual realm and death shall no longer...

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