In "The Guest," Daru uses verbal irony when he exclaims, "Odd pupils!"  Is verbal irony the same as sarcasm? Explain.

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Although sarcasm is a type of verbal irony, not all examples of verbal irony are intended as sarcasm.

Based on the example from “The Guest” by Albert Camus , Daru’s comment is not sarcasm. The verbal irony in this excerpt stems from Daru calling Balducci and the...

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Although sarcasm is a type of verbal irony, not all examples of verbal irony are intended as sarcasm.

Based on the example from “The Guest” by Albert Camus, Daru’s comment is not sarcasm. The verbal irony in this excerpt stems from Daru calling Balducci and the prisoner students because they are lodged in a schoolhouse. Since Daru is a teacher, this is likely his version of humor.

Sarcasm typically underscores an incongruity between what someone says and what they mean, particularly when it comes to his or her attitude toward the topic at hand. More specifically, sarcasm is usually employed to convey disdain or contempt. If Daru had replied to Balducci with, “Great,” one might consider it sarcasm since Daru is not exactly happy that Balducci has tasked him with turning in the prisoner.

Instead, Daru’s ironic remark is light-hearted and intended to diffuse the tension of the present situation.

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"Irony - a dryly humorous or lightly sarcastic figure of speech in which the literal meaning of a word or statement is the opposite of that intended. In literature, it is the technique of indicating an intention or attitude opposed to what is actually stated."

"Good," said Daru. "And where are you headed?"

Balducci withdrew his mustache from the tea. "Here, Son."

"Odd pupils! And you're spending the night?"

In this exchange Daru is saying that the Policeman and the prisoner are "odd pupils" because he is a teacher and they are in a schoolhouse not a prison.  He is indicating that it is odd that the police would be headed to the school instead of a police station, thus the verbal irony.

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