Dante's Inferno mentions the angels Michael, Raphael, & Gabriel, but the apocrypha list many angels. What are the origins of guardian angels? I can list certain references that contain knowledge of different angels, but most are symbolic and hard to truly interpret: apocalypse of st.peter the book of Enoch the secrets of enoch the gospel of light the gospel of the egyptians  

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The English word “angel” translates a Greek term “angelos” that simply means “messenger” and is used for the human messengers in secular literature such as Homer as well as for divine messengers. The  best known are the archangels (archangelos) Michael, Gabriel, Raphael; the Book of Enoch adds Uriel, Selaphiel, Jegudiel,...

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The English word “angel” translates a Greek term “angelos” that simply means “messenger” and is used for the human messengers in secular literature such as Homer as well as for divine messengers.

The  best known are the archangels (archangelos) Michael, Gabriel, Raphael; the Book of Enoch adds Uriel, Selaphiel, Jegudiel, and Barachiel. Much of the elaboration of the angelic traditions occurs in various non-canonical Biblical books and early and medieval Christian literature such as ps.-Dionysus’ Celestial Hierarchy.

The notion of a personal guardian spirit pre-dates Judaeo-Christian religion – it is a major feature of Mesopotamian religions and the pagan religions of the Mediterranean. This concept gradually became assimilated into Christianity on the level of folk tradition, but is not part of the official doctrine of most Christian denominations.

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