Cry, The Beloved Country QuestionHow does the spiritual reassessment or moral reconciliation that James Jarvis and Stephen Kumalo face in their journey contribute to the novel's theme of hope...

Cry, The Beloved Country Question

How does the spiritual reassessment or moral reconciliation that James Jarvis and Stephen Kumalo face in their journey contribute to the novel's theme of hope and/or injustice?

Asked on by rovers12

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lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

James Jarvis certainly experiences a "reassessment" of a spiritual and/or intellectual sort when he reads his son's writings about the social and political situation of the native peoples of South Africa.  He writes about how Lincoln serves as an inspiration for a united people and a united nation.  He writes about why the current system of division of races is detrimental to the future of the country.  Jarvis's world view shifts after reading what exactly his son was thinking about and working on for his entire adult life.  Readers can see the evidence of this shift when at the end of the novel he provides the financial backing to bring in engineers to help teach the native people better farming methods, and in a small way by his provision of basic sustenance for the children, milk.

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

Stephen faces the reality that localities can mar the lives of their inhabitants as surely as any negligent family member can do. This injustice is what he must learn to live with. James faces the same reality of injustice. Together they build hope by trying to provide a better way through James's new efforts for those who remain and who are yet to come.

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