In The Crucible, Reverend Parris is very self-centered. Other than the example of the golden candlesticks and the end of the play, what is an example?By end of the play he wanted the people to...

In The Crucible, Reverend Parris is very self-centered. Other than the example of the golden candlesticks and the end of the play, what is an example?

By end of the play he wanted the people to confess so his name is not spoiled. 

Asked on by gkacy15

1 Answer | Add Yours

e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Earlier in the play, an anecdote is told about Parris. When he came into the town he demanded that the townspeople provide him with chopped fire-wood.

According to Parris, this should be part of his pay and fulfills a function of his respecatable stature in the community. However, everyone else in the town gathers and chops fire-wood for his/her own household.

Some townspeople believe that this request was inappropriate and demonstrated an arrogance in Parris. Proctor in particular resents the demands from Parris. 

Proctor’s conflict with Parris stems from what he sees to be the minister’s hypocrisy of wanting more than his due.

At the end of the play, Parris actually wants to save his own life. Rebellions against the court have sprung up in nearby towns leading to violence. Parris is worried that if the hangings go forward (the hanging of Proctor in particular) without a confession, there may be a rebellion in Salem. 

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,957 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question