What makes Fahrenheit 451 relevant in the 21st century, particularly regarding politics?Original question: criticism of present day tendencies and Bradburys view of possible future developments...

What makes Fahrenheit 451 relevant in the 21st century, particularly regarding politics?

Original question: criticism of present day tendencies and Bradburys view of possible future developments concerning POLITICS

The edit is a best guess at the actual query.

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thewritingteacher eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Fahrenheit 451 is one of those classic books that will always be relevant as long as there are powerful politicians and an ambivalent population.

When Bradbury wrote the book, the Cold War was at its zenith and the population was willing to give up liberties for security. Bradbury recognized the danger of giving politicians that kind of power over information, and he wrote in vehement protest of allowing books to be burned (in the US) and thought to be controlled (in the USSR).

In the 21st century, ambivalence of the population is a greater threat to freedom of thought than control by governmental force.  Societies around the world seem to be more and more willing to sacrifice liberty (and responsibility) for security (and complacency.) A multi-media driven system of information is a modern interpretation of Bradbury's TV walls and massive billboards. People, in general, prefer entertainment to philosophy, and this is the beginning of apathy.

Bradbury warns against news that isn't news, voters swayed by style over substance, and a mindset that life has so little value that nothing really matters anyway. Millie's "seashells" mirror Ipods of today. The "family" is frighteningly familiar in current reality and dramatic television with internet "voting" and participation. Fast cars, high risk behavior, ridicule of non-conformists---all these were predicted by Bradbury more than 50 years ago.

When politicians say one thing and do another, pass bills without reading them, and use wars to distract from corrupt practices---all without an outcry from the citizenry--Bradbury's greatest fears are closer than ever to becoming reality.

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Fahrenheit 451

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