In "Crispin: The Lead of Cross," what does Crispin observe about Lady Furnival?

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In Chapter 37, Crispin manages to catch a glimpse of Lady Furnival when he goes out to explore the city of Great Wexly. As she passes by, Crispin observes that Lady Furnival is a woman of great wealth.

She is riding side-saddle on a huge, black horse 'whose saddle and...

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In Chapter 37, Crispin manages to catch a glimpse of Lady Furnival when he goes out to explore the city of Great Wexly. As she passes by, Crispin observes that Lady Furnival is a woman of great wealth.

She is riding side-saddle on a huge, black horse 'whose saddle and harness' is 'trimmed with gleaming silver.' Beneath her black cape, her brilliant blue gown is trimmed with golden fur and presents an arresting sight. Her shoes are also golden in color and stylishly pointed. With her hair encased in a 'netted cap of black lace' and her hands ringed with sparkling jewels, Lady Furnival is a sight to behold. Six burly guards with swords walk around her; one leads her horse and the others cluster around her, as the procession makes its way through the city. Although their costumes are not as lavish as that of Lady Furnival's, the guards are splendidly dressed in gold-and-blue livery with black armbands on their left sleeves.

A young boy precedes the entourage; his job is to blow his horn to announce the lady's progress through the city. Crispin is amazed at the wealth arrayed before his eyes; he cannot fathom the amazing sight he has just observed.

 

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