Is the creature a victim, a monster or something altogether different? At which point does he become evil, if he does?The creature read 3 books that influenced him: Sorrows of Werther, Paradise...

Is the creature a victim, a monster or something altogether different? At which point does he become evil, if he does?

The creature read 3 books that influenced him: Sorrows of Werther, Paradise Lost, and a volume of Plutarch's lives. 2 of these were of beings who chose to do wrong. Plutarch's lives were of noble people who still suffered but did good things in their lives.

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mstultz72 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The monster is an synthesis of archetypes, an allegorical first man.  Like the biblical Adam, he is the first and only of his kind.  He suffers loneliness and wants a mate.  He is, therefore, an existential hero, as he questions his existence and demands a response from an unforgiving god, Victor.

He is also a monster, hideous to civilized eyes, a savage beast who lives with animals.  When he sees himself in the water mirror, he is repulsed by his own image.  He is, therefore, a Satanic hero: cast out from his father's safe haven.  As a result, he rebels against his father, out of prideful spite.

The Monster is a child, one who looks to others for guidance.  He must learn to read and write.  After he spies on the DeLacys and sees the inner workings of a family, he wants a bride, an Eve.  Language acquisition leads to familial values.  He understands that he must be insulated by others like him; otherwise, he is condemned to be alone forever.

Finally, the monster becomes an agent of divine evil, a punisher for his father's crimes.  He is Victor's Doppelganger, his ghostly twin, a dark alter-ego, a secret self, the id.  Not so much a victim, the monster uses an Old Testament form of revenge against Victor's family.  Once a Golem who protected his people, the monster is now an agent of holy retribution who seeks to make Victor aware of his tragic responsibilities.

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Frankenstein

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