How would you create a flow chart to explain the different steps involved to pass an ordinary bill compared to a money bill?

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mkoren eNotes educator| Certified Educator

All bills, except money bills, may begin in either the House of Representatives or Senate. To make it easier, I will share the steps that a money bill must follow in order to become a law. The steps are the same for all bills, but a money bill must start in the House of Representatives.

  • The bill must be introduced into the House of Representatives.
  • Once the bill is introduced, it will go to a committee in the House of Representatives. This committee will decide if the bill should move forward. If the committee doesn’t feel the bill should move forward, then it will kill the bill by voting not to present it to the entire House of Representatives.
  • If the bill clears the committee, then the full House of Representatives will vote on the bill. If it passes, it will go the Senate.
  • Once the bill passes the House of Representatives, it will go the Senate and be introduced there.
  • It will then be assigned to a committee of the Senate. This committee will decide if the bill should move forward. If the committee doesn’t feel it should move forward, then it will kill the bill by voting not to present it to the entire Senate.
  • If it passes the Senate committee, it will go to the full Senate for a vote. If it passes the Senate, the bill will move forward.
  • If the bill has the same wording in the Senate and the House of Representatives, it will go to the President. If the wording is different, a conference committee will work out the differences so both houses can pass the bill with identical wording. Then it will go to the President.
  • If the President signs the bill, it will become a law.
  • If the President vetoes the bill, it will go back to both the Senate and the House of Representatives. If both houses pass the bill with at least a two-thirds majority, the veto is overridden. The bill will then become a law.

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