Could you please tell me what is a "weather man" and a "patron" in the following excerpt from the chapter 5 of The Great Gatsby. Does "weather man" refer to drawings used in newspaper weather...

Could you please tell me what is a "weather man" and a "patron" in the following excerpt from the chapter 5 of The Great Gatsby. Does "weather man" refer to drawings used in newspaper weather forecasts, in which a smiling face indicated good weather, and "patron" a patron saint?

“Has it?” When he realized what I was talking about, that there were twinkle-bells of sunshine in the room, he smiled like a weather man, like an ecstatic patron of recurrent light, and repeated the news to Daisy. “What do you think of that? It’s stopped raining.”

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Fitzgerald is using two different similes to describe Gatsby's actions and feelings at this time when he is finally reunited with Daisy. 

First, he compares Gatsby with the person who has to deliver weather forecasts predicting rainy weather, which is frequently not a welcome forecast. When the rain stops, the weather man is able to smile again as he predicts sunny weather returning.

Secondly, Fitzgerald uses the word "patron" as talking about someone who is a regular customer of a particular item. In this case, he is describing Gatsby as becoming as excited about the "twinkle-bells of sunshine in the room" as would someone who likes to buy light that can come back frequently - "recurrent light."

 

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teachersage | (Level 2) Educator

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In this chapter, Gatsby finally achieves his dream of reuniting with Daisy. Nick, who arranged the meeting, tactfully leaves, and then after he feels he has been gone as long as is prudent, returns, making every possible noise to signal his entrance. About the time of his return, the pouring rain ends. As Nick reenters, he notes that there was a change in Gatsby, nervous and badly on edge earlier, that was "simply confounding." Gatsby, like the freshly watered earth and the newly emerged sunshine, "literally glowed." In Nick's eyes, "a new well-being radiated from him" and filled the room.

While the sun coming out mirrors Gatsby's new mood of bright, exultant joy, Nick could have said anything and elicited an ecstatic response from his friend. When he says the sun is out, yes, Gatsby does beam like the smiling, sunny face of weatherman offering a good forecast or a sunny weather icon in a newspaper. Rather than patron saint, he is more likely simply a patron, meaning a supporter or client, of the sun, ready to embrace the entire world in his joy.

Since yellow is a color strongly associated with Gatsby, as in his yellow car, as well as the color of the sun, both the good weather and Gatsby's sunny reaction to it, as well as his overarching, joyful embrace of it, show him at the high point of his happiness, at one, at least for this moment, with the universe.

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