Could someone suggest a critical essay - scholarly, peer-reviewed - on the short story?  I need one to reference in a research paper.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The link inclued is a fairly good read about several Rushdie works.  The short story in question is featured and with it are some interesting analyses about some of the ideas in the story.  For instance, the story possessing a theme of nationalism is something of interest in that the article makes the claim that Miss Rehana would rather live a happy life in India than a miserable one in England.  This inverts the traditional depiction of the West from those in the East and is something that reflects a unique element in the story.  The other element that is interesting in the review is the discussion of the unreliable narrator.  Certainly, this is something in Rushdie's works, but could have been expanded a bit to reflect how this is a dominant presence in other works written by Rushdie.  The enotes link might also yield some good information that could assist you in the research process.

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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The short story, "Good Advice Is Rarer Than Rubies" by Salman Rushdie, is one of the stories in his 1987 collection East, West. This means that as you are searching for scholarly references, you should search both for the story title and for the collection title. 

There are three main databases you should use for such searches. The first site you should visit is Google Scholar, which can be found at: 

https://scholar.google.com/

This has the same user interface as Google but restricts its search to scholarly articles. One source you will find in such a search is a chapter in a scholarly essay collection:

Elena Furlanetto. “As Rare as Rubies”: Did Salman Rushdie Invent Turkish American-Literature?". In Postcolonial Gateways and Walls, ed. Daria Tunca and Janet Wilson. Brill, 2016.

If you go to your university library website, you will find two important databases, the MLA International Bibliography and JStor. Searching for the title of the story in these databases will point you toward a few other critical works which have some discussion of the story. Among the most often cited references are:

Florence Cabaret, "From Location to Dislocation in Salman Rushdie’s East, West and Rohinton Mistry’s Tales from Firozsha Baag" in Tropes and Territories Short Fiction, Postcolonial Readings, Canadian Writings in Context. Edited by Marta Dvorak and W.H. New.

Rebecca L. Walkowitz. Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation. Columbia University Press, 2006.

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