What is the best way to separate two liquids?  Would filtration work?

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Filtration is not the best way to separate liquids unless there is such an obvious difference in the physical properties of each liquid that the one with less density can pass through the filtration system while the denser liquid cannot.  In such circumstances, though, the liquids are likely to separate...

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Filtration is not the best way to separate liquids unless there is such an obvious difference in the physical properties of each liquid that the one with less density can pass through the filtration system while the denser liquid cannot.  In such circumstances, though, the liquids are likely to separate themselves, with the denser one concentrating at the bottom of the container and the less dense one accumulating on the top.

A better way of separating liquids is with a centrifuge, which is a cylinder into which liquids, gasses or other substances are inserted and then spun extremely quickly.  The high-speed spinning process forces the different substances -- in this case, the liquids -- to separate according to density.  Centrifuges range from relatively simple and inexpensive to extremely sophisticated and very expensive.  The better the centrifuge, the better the results one will receive, but for simple experiments, simple centrifuges will suffice.

Another way of separating liquids is through the freezing process.  We know that water freezes at 32 degrees Fahrenheit, but many other liquids freeze at higher or lower temperatures.  By subjecting the liquids to extremely cold temperatures, they will, again, separate according to density, salinity and other physical properties.  If freezing is not an option, then boiling can attain the same results, as, again, liquids of differing physical properties will boil at different temperatures.  We know that water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit, but other liquids will vary according to their composition.

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