Could anyone please help me identify a brief summary of the book Love and Hate in Jamestown? What are some of the main points of the book? How would you classify the book?

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Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Start of a New Nation by David Price (2003) is a meticulously researched and well-written work of historical nonfiction. It recounts the history of the Jamestown colony and the major figures in that history. It is largely based on...

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Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Start of a New Nation by David Price (2003) is a meticulously researched and well-written work of historical nonfiction. It recounts the history of the Jamestown colony and the major figures in that history. It is largely based on primary documents, thus allowing dry and often distorted histories to be supplanted by intimate human portraits.

The Jamestown Colony was founded in 1607 by 104 men who were sent by investors in a London-based stock company that was chartered by King James. The group was composed mainly of aristocrats, and their charge was to find gold and the elusive Northwest Passage to Asia. They were ill-equipped for the realities of the swampy land, the mosquitos and (consequently) the malaria that they encountered, and did not possess the physical stamina or skills needed to survive.

Within a year, more than half of them had died, and the aristocratic leadership was beset by infighting. Among the leaders was the military man John Smith, who had little regard for aristocratic rank and was widely detested. However, in desperation, they eventually turned to his leadership. He ended the search for gold and the Northwest Passage, made everyone go to work clearing land, planting crops, and building structures, and fed everyone from a common storehouse.

Because the narrative is based on primary documents, Price presents a balanced picture of native-settler relations. The native chieftain, Powhatan, was a strong and capable leader. Early on, the settlers got most of their food by trading with his tribe, but tribal members grew upset and often violent as their hunting grounds were being cleared by the settlers.

Smith was captured at one point and his life was saved by Powhatan's eleven-year-old daughter Pocahontas. When Smith returned to England and starvation was rampant, Pocahontas helped the colonists. Contrary to popular myth, however, she was never romantically involved with Smith; she did, however, later marry John Rolfe and accompany him to England.

Over time, the Virginia Holding Company tried to bolster the colony by sending more settlers (most of whom perished) and unmarried women so that the remaining settlers could begin families. Violence and tragedy continued to unfold, however, in the interactions between the settlers and the natives.

As part of Price's overarching themes, he includes the role of governing corporations, the changing views on rank and equality, the growing concept of liberty, the relationship between work and food, and the resulting values that would become an integral part of a new nation.

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In the book Love and Hate in Jamestown, Price tells about the difficult times in the early Virginia, from Jamestown's founding to the 1622 massacre. He also eludicates the unusual friendship between John Smith and the Indian princess Pocahontas. Smith was a common soldier. The London-based Virginia Company recruited him for the expedition on account of his military experience.Smith was not liked by his well heeled colleagues; and he couldn't get a position on the colony's governing council.

Most of the adventurers in 1607 who first came selected Jamestown as the area to make a colony even though it was mostly swamps. By summer, most ships returned to England carrying colonists who would rather give up and remain alive than starve. The remaining colony was eating cornmeal. The gentlemen adventurers were not able to work, and disease set in. Half the colony was dead in the Fall, and Smith was put in charge of obtaining supplies from the Indians.

He took an expedition up the river and was captured by the forces of Chief Powhatan.

It is clear in Price's novel that the English did not find Virginia's woods inhabited by peaceful Indians or by violent ones. Instead it was, as stated in the text, "a tightly run, martially adept empire." Smith's life was in danger but then saved by Powhatan's 11-year-old daughter, Pocahontas.

Her name means "little wanton,". The critics say she is the book's most interesting character. She had no romantic involvement with Smith. But Pocahontas took a long term interest in the surviving colonies future.

When Smith returned to Jamestown, it was during a critical time when several leaders of the colony were about to give up, steal a ship and go back to England. The men then made up lies against Smith and he was almost hanged, just before a ship arrived from England with fresh food, supplies and more colonists. Therefore, for the next few years, Smith led the colony from 1608-09. That winter was known in history as the "Starving Time." Six months after Smith left, many died, leaving only 60 colonists out of 500. The colony was saved by another fleet from England.

This book is "realistic" in terms of how the colonists got along with the Indians. It is realistic in terms of how well organised Chief Powhatan was and the brave and altruistic nature of Pocahontas. It was realistic in that it showed Smith's roots and his struggles amongst his peers.

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