Could anyone analyze Emily Dickinson's poem number 130, "These are the days when birds come back"?

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In this poem, Dickinson's speaker describes the way the beautiful days of late summer mimic the days of early summer in June. For a moment, nature's soft beauty can deceive a few birds—and the speaker—into believing that summer is beginning, not ending. It is almost plausible to think it really...

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In this poem, Dickinson's speaker describes the way the beautiful days of late summer mimic the days of early summer in June. For a moment, nature's soft beauty can deceive a few birds—and the speaker—into believing that summer is beginning, not ending. It is almost plausible to think it really is June.

For a brief time the speaker, like the birds but unlike the busy, focused bees, can delude herself, using her imagination and nature's cues, into believing it is June and that she has a whole summer of warmth ahead. However, reality takes over: when the speaker see the "timid leaf" fall, she knows summer is actually coming to an end.

We can see, therefore, that the poem sets up an opposition between the longings of the imagination (for example, that it be June) and the reality that fall (cold) is coming. A person can even, the poem argues, at least for a short time, willfully misread nature's signs to make them align with one's desires.

This sets up the final, religious part of the poem, which is ambiguous. The speaker asks us to join in the "sacrament" of communion with these late summer days. The poem ends by likening them to the Christian Eucharist:

Thy sacred emblems to partake,

Thy consecrated bread to break,

Taste thine immortal wine!

But the speaker leaves open-ended what exactly this communion is: are we communing with the illusion that it is June or with the reality that, though the days are beautiful, cold is coming? The speaker suggests that religious observance is an illusion if we pretend that it always means communion with early summer (beauty and ease) and aligned with reality if we accept religion not only as a communion with beauty, but with the cold (suffering) to come.

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This trochaic poem, with Dickinson's irregular punctuation, has an irregular rhyme scheme with the 1st and 2nd lines sometimes rhyming with near rhyme, but not always:

These are the days when Birds come back—
A very few—a Bird or two—
To take a backward look.

These are the days when skies resume
The old—old sophistries of June—
A blue and gold mistake.

It's theme is a twist on the sacred religious theme of Communion. It compares the return of birds to a fraud that threatens to "cheat the bees." It invites children to partake of the ritual of returning waves of nature's patterns.

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