What are some of the main arguments of Florence Stratton's essay titled "The Mother Africa Trope"?

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vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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In her essay titled “The Mother Africa Trope,” Florence Stratton makes a number of particular arguments, including the following:

  • Many male African writers present Africa itself in their writings “in the figure of a woman.”
  • This way of thinking of Africa may have roots in some native African cultural traditions.
  • Ultimately, Stratton hopes to show that

the trope operates against the interests of women, excluding them, implicitly if not explicitly, from authorship and citizenship.

  • In the writings of many recent male African authors, the depiction of Africa as a woman helps to counteract negative colonial stereotypes.
  • However, the stereotype of Africa as a woman can also help support colonial stereotypes that associate Africans with emotions rather than with reason.
  • Depicting Africa as a woman may help to strengthen such binary categories as

male and female, domination and subordination, mind and body, subject and object, self and other.

  • The stereotype of Africa as female makes the male writer the powerful figure.
  • Often male writers present Africa not simply as a woman but as a mother. Africa is thus expected to

bear the writer’s interpretation of history, just as she might bear his baby.

  • Male writers sometimes vary the stereotype (for instance, by presenting Africa as a prostitute) but it remains very common in their writings.
  • Sometimes male writers associate the idea of Africa as woman with the idea of African traditions, with the woman as a metaphorical figure of cultural continuity.
  • In the final analysis, the trope

justifies and therefore serves to perpetuate the status quo of male domination.

 

 

Sources:
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mjay25 | Student, Graduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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Thank you, is there anywhere where I can gain access to the full text for free online?

Googlebooks often hides the pages I'd like!

 

 

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