Consider whether Maycomb is changed by the conclusion. It shapes people and events, but it is also shaped by its inhabitants and their actions.Explain the weight and importance of character this...

Consider whether Maycomb is changed by the conclusion. It shapes people and events, but it is also shaped by its inhabitants and their actions.

Explain the weight and importance of character this county takes on.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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While the prevailing attitudes--Maycomb's "usual disease" as Atticus refers to these attitudes--are yet existant after the trial of Tom Robinson, there has been an encouraging sign for its cure when the jury remains out for a "few hours."  In Chapter 23, Atticus tells his disheartened son,

"That was the one thing that made me think, well, this may be the shadow of a beginning.  That jury took a few hours.  An inevitable verdict, maybe, but usually it takes 'em just a few minutes.  This time--"

Atticus intimates that one of the Cunninghams may have been the one juror who held out for hours before being pressured by the majority.  So, if there is one such as a Cunningham who can have his attitudes altered, then there probably someone else will begin to rethink some of his/her attitudes.  For, as Miss Maudie remarks to the children, Maycomb has paid Atticus "the tribute to do right." And, he has done so publicly and in a manner that will have a profound affect on the people of the town:

The handful of people in this town who say that fair play is not marked White Only; the handful of people who say a fair trial is for everybody, not us us; the handful of people with enought humility to think, when they look at a Negro, there but for the Lord's kindness am I."

Certainly, after people learn of Bob Ewell's brutal attack upon the children of the trial defender as well as his causing indirectly Tom Robinson's desperate attempt to run and his unfortuante shooting, many of the residents may well wonder if it is time for a change.

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