Consider the relationship between Ferdinand and Miranda in act 3, scene 1 and its relevance to The Tempest.

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The budding relationship between Ferdinand and Miranda is one of the most important but also unlikely aspects of the play's plot. The contradictory role of her very manipulative father is evident here, as Prospero congratulates himself that things are turning out just as he planned. Prospero's hypocrisy and self-centered lack of real regard for others are also on display. He lurks and spies on the young people and brags that he has engaged in all his unethical dealings just for his daughter's benefit rather than his own.

When the young people meet, they are very confused. Ferdinand is literally lost: shipwrecked, he has no idea where he is. Miranda has memories only of the island and the people she knows there. Ferdinand is the first possible peer, as a potential friend or romantic partner, she has ever met. Shakespeare leans on the dramatic convention of true love as destiny to make their unlikely sudden affinity believable. It is fate rather than her father's magic that brings them...

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