Consider how the social structures in Annie John affect the characters' personal lives. In what ways does Annie's relationship with her mother replicate the colonialist/patriarchal pattern of domination and oppression that underlies the history of Antigua? Please examine and provide specific examples from the novel to prove your claims.

In Annie John, Annie’s mother models behavior for Annie that is expected of women in her society, and this replicates the colonialist/patriarchal pattern of domination in that it is similar to the way that Western colonial forces expected indigenous people to learn Western customs. Annie's mother is also controlling and harsh toward Annie, in contrast to Ma Chess, a woman who rejects Western culture. This contrast suggests that colonial forces are destructive and immoral.

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It is an insightful observation to note that Annie’s relationship with her mother replicates the colonial domination that the book critiques. Consider how Annie’s mother communicated with her more when Annie was younger than when she was an adolescent and how that communication tended to focus on what the expectations...

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It is an insightful observation to note that Annie’s relationship with her mother replicates the colonial domination that the book critiques. Consider how Annie’s mother communicated with her more when Annie was younger than when she was an adolescent and how that communication tended to focus on what the expectations for Annie as a woman were.

For example, Annie's mother taught her how to do several types of housework. This is similar to the way in which colonial forces have historically gone into lands like Antigua and modeled Western ways of life with a sort of savior-like mentality. For example, consider how European missionaries would go into countries that had their own religions and force the locals to adapt to Christianity. Annie's mother's expectant and oftentimes condescending attitude when teaching Annie certain practices reflects this colonialist behavior.

When Annie gets older, her mother starts to be more controlling and mean. For example, consider the scene in which her mother calls her a slut just for talking to a boy. A parallel can be drawn between this extreme judgmental behavior and the violent, judgmental, and controlling behavior that colonial forces exhibited toward Indigenous people. It is also interesting to note that Ma Chess, Annie's grandmother who rejects Western culture, is more of a mother figure to Annie. This relationship draws attention to how poor Annie’s real mother treats her, which symbolizes how poorly the colonizers treated the Indigenous people of Antigua.

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