Consider Henrik Ibsen as a realist, as a naturalist, and as a symbolist.

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First, it might be useful to define realism, naturalism, and the symbolist movement. Then, we can see how Ibsen fits into each category.

Realism is exactly what it sounds like: a style which emphasizes depicting life as it is lived, without pretense or melodrama . In realism, dialogue is...

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First, it might be useful to define realism, naturalism, and the symbolist movement. Then, we can see how Ibsen fits into each category.

Realism is exactly what it sounds like: a style which emphasizes depicting life as it is lived, without pretense or melodrama. In realism, dialogue is natural. Acting styles tend to feel more candid rather than stylized.

Naturalism is a bit like realism in showing life as it is lived, but there is a stronger focus on the influence of genetics and the environment on the individual. Naturalist works often question the existence of free will. After all, if your background defines who you are and how you are most likely to behave, how much freedom do you really have?

The symbolist movement was seen as a reaction to both realism and naturalism. Symbolist art tends to focus on imagination and spirituality—things which cannot be experienced with the senses. Symbolist drama tends to focus on metaphor and, of course, symbolism. It is less interested in gritty details.

Ibsen could be seen as fitting into each of these groups. His plays often are realistic, focusing on the social issues of the day and featuring characters with complicated psychology. Naturalism also plays a role in his work: both Nora in A Doll's House and Mrs. Alving in Ghosts are deeply affected by their society's expectations of proper behavior, even acting against their own interests in order to appear respectable.

Even though his works do have that realist/naturalist bent, Ibsen could be seen as a symbolist as well, or at least a distant relation of symbolists. As mentioned in a previous answer, Nora's home is the titular "doll's house" and serves as a concrete manifestation of her spiritual entrapment.

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Ibsen can be considered a realist in that he strives for a certain consistency of action and psychological complexity. That is, Ibsen is interested in why things happen and what consequences those events can have; an example is the father's syphilis in Ghosts, and the ramifications for his family.

Naturalism is distinct from realism in that it is concerned with the effect of large social problems on the lives of people. One example in Ibsen is Nora's struggle against the monolithic institutions of family and marriage in A Doll's House. These institutions require Nora to act a part she comes to realize is soul-crushing; she must decide whether to allow her individuality to be subsumed by her role as wife and mother, or to change into a person who can escape.

Ibsen can also be thought of as a symbolist, in that he often reduces complex conflicts to specific concrete symbols. Nora's troubled marriage is like living in a doll's house, in that she is constantly on display and is a plaything for others. This symbol extends to the staging of the play, which takes place entirely in the living room of Nora's house: the stage itself is like a doll's house.

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Realist, as the characters and events are life-like and are not affected by supernatural and the like.

Naturalist, for he writes about characters and natures being influenced by heredity and past (the naturalists are highly influenced by Darwinian theory of evolution). Naturalism is a deeper kind of a realism and is concerned with individualism as such, which Ibsen too seems to be concerned about.

Symbolist, yes absolutely, as can be seen in his plays such as Hedda Gabler, where the setting itself is symbolic of the atmosphere. There is this inner room which symbolizes Hedda's past, there are those withered stately powers that symbolize the lost Glory of her aristocratic lineage, and there are the pistols that enhance her phallic character.  

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Ibsen is considered the Father of Modern Drama.  He is considered the first modern realist because he dealt with contemporary issues, I.e. he explores the role of women in modern society in The Doll's House.  Nora could be considered the first feminist when she declares her freedom at the end of the play.

As for naturalist, I'm not sure what you mean by this.  Admittedly realism and naturalism are closely related but naturalism is considered more gritty, I.e. The Lower Depths.

Although he may use some symbols, as do many writers, I would not consider him a symbolist.   I see more symbolism in The Glass Menagerie.

By defying accepted practices in the theatre and writing about real issues confronting recognizable people, he opened the door to modern drama, thus the title Father of Modern Drama when referring to Ibsen.

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