What are some examples of connections between these geography subjects: the diversity of Canada's natural landscapes; natural resources and the challenge of sustainability; Canadian industries...

What are some examples of connections between these geography subjects: the diversity of Canada's natural landscapes; natural resources and the challenge of sustainability; Canadian industries (location, impact and opportunity); people, places and patterns; and Canada and the world? 

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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There are many possible connections between these broad topics in geography.  Let us look at a few of them.  Perhaps the best way to do this is to examine the ways in which “The diversity of Canada’s natural landscapes” is connected to the other four topics listed here.

The diversity of Canada’s natural landscapes is connected to the idea of natural resources and sustainability in at least two important ways.  First, the diversity of Canada’s natural landscapes dictates the types of natural resources that are available in the country.  Second, certain aspects of the natural landscapes dictate that Canada will use a lot of energy and will have issues with sustainability.  For example, let us look at the average temperatures in Montreal.  For four months, December through March, the average high does not get above 3° C.    This means that people in that city will need to use a great deal of energy on heating in those months, making it harder for Canada to achieve sustainability. 

Of course, the diversity of Canada’s natural landscapes has a great deal to do with Canadian industries and with people, places, and patterns.  The diversity of Canada’s natural landscapes determines what industries will arise in which places.  For example, Edmonton is the center of Canada’s oil and gas industry because those resources happen to be concentrated in Alberta.  Similarly, farming in Canada is concentrated in the prairies of Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan because those are the places where the climate and topography are best suited for agriculture.  This diversity of natural landscapes and the distribution of natural resources also determines where people will live.  Canada’s major cities tend to be on bodies of water, particularly in areas where the climate is not too severe.  This connection shows us, for example, why there are so many people in Ontario and relatively few people in Saskatchewan.

Finally, the diversity of Canada’s natural landscapes is closely connected to the topic of Canada and the world (this connection also includes the challenge of sustainability).  Because of the diversity of Canada’s landscapes and resources (and because of its location), Canada engages in a great deal of trade with other countries.  Canada exports things like petroleum from Alberta, agricultural products from the plains, and forest products from British Columbia.  These exports are possible because of the diversity of Canada’s landscapes and resources.  The exports help to determine Canada’s place in the world and its relations with various other countries.

There are, of course, many other connections between these five aspects of Canadian geography.  These aspects are closely connected to one another, making it difficult at times to draw clear dividing lines between them.

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