What is the conflict in the story? is it internal or external?  is the setting specific or general and how does it contribute to the central idea(s)? the main character static or dynamic?

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Both previous editors are correct here in identifying that the conflict is both internal and external, in that the characters represent different views or opinions within Ireland of the time of publication. "The Dead" is a very clever story for a number of reasons, but primarily because it works on a number of different levels. Not only does Gabriel suffer an inner conflict between the role that he plays and the Gabriel he would like to be, it is clear that he represents an opposing political school of thought to Miss Ivors, for example, and an opposing way of living your life to Michael Furey.

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As the final story in Joyce's "Dubliners,"  a complex structure with much symbolism, that Joyce himself said he created "to betray the soul of that hemiplegia or paralysis which many consider a city." Gabriel's character is the final stage in a modern version of the ages of man. In Joyce's work, many characters play representative roles.  For example, Miss Ivors of "The Dead" is Irish Ireland (western), Little Chandler represents the typical Revival poetaster, the harp personifies Ireland, Father Flynn the spiritually ignorant priest, whose past contains some unmentionable shame.

Thus, in this final story, Gabriel's conflicts are representative of many of the previous ones:  the pettiness of life under British rule against the beauty of Irish Ireland, the compromising of oneself in the interest of getting ahead, the lack of self-understanding and understanding of others. At the end of "The Dead," Gabriel reaches this epiphany and feels "The time had come for him to set out on his journey westward."  (Earlier in the story, Molly...

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