At the conference with the neighboring farmers, what new changes does Napoleon point out?

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In the last chapter of the novella, Napoleon invites the neighboring farmers to tour and inspect Animal Farm. During their conference that evening in the farmhouse, Napoleon says that his sole purpose is to live at peace and maintain normal business relationships with the neighboring farms. He then points out that the animals' "foolish custom" of addressing one another as "Comrade" has been suppressed. Napoleon also points out that the custom of marching past a boar's skull every Sunday morning is now forbidden, and he remarks that the skull has already been buried. Napoleon then mentions that the white hoof and horn flag, which had been previously flying over Animal Farm, has been replaced by a simple green flag. Most importantly, Napoleon has renamed the farm back to its original title, Manor Farm. The renaming of Animal Farm signifies the complete change back to the oppressive conditions under Mr. Jones's reign, illustrating how tyranny has spawned more tyranny. 

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Never one for speeches, Napoleon points out some new changes at the end of the novel in quick fashion.  The first would be that the animals will no longer refer to one another as "Comrade", something that he dismissed as not needed on the farm.  The flag has been changed as well as the boar's skull in the front is now gone.  Finally, the farm's name will go back to "Manor Farm."

On some levels, the changes are not really "changes" as they help to bring life on the farm to the same place it was under Jones.  The only difference is that the pigs assume the role of leadership and not Jones.  Additionally, the idea of a "revolution" is brought to a theoretical point of reckoning:  The full rotation 360 degrees.  In this, Napoleon's changes have brought the story and the political narrative of the farm full circle.  The more things have changed, the more they have stayed the same.  In this, I think that there is some level of thematic significance in that Orwell is trying to make a point about those in the position of power and how declaring independence and maintaining it end up becoming two separate realities.

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In the final chapter of Animal Farm, Napoleon invites a number of neighbouring farmers to "make a tour of inspection" around the farm and he uses this as an opportunity to publicise some of the changes that he has introduced. He has abolished the "rather foolish custom" of addressing each other as "Comrade," for example, and stopped the animals from marching past Old Major's skull each Sunday. This, he calls, a "strange custom." In addition, Napoleon has also removed the "white hoof and horn" from the farm's flag and has also changed the name of the farm to "The Manor Farm." This, he believes, is its "correct and original name."

That Napoleon refers to many of these customs as "strange" suggests that he is trying to distance himself from the animals and appear more like a human. It also shows that Napoleon has betrayed the principles of Animalism (which emphasise the hatred of animals towards humans) in return for absolute control.

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At this point in the story we have come full cycle.  Most of the original animals involved in the early days of the revolution have died.  The lives of the animals are worse than they were before the revolution, but they have nothing to compare their present condition with, and by this time they wouldn't be able to judge anyway (prelude to "Who controls the present..." in Orwell's "1984."  When the neigbhors arrive, Napoleon announces a new era of cooperation between animals and humans, quite a turn around from their attitude toward Mr. Jones.  The animals will no longer refer to each other as "comrade," the hoof and horn have been removed from the flag, and, perhaps most importantly, the farm has been renamed "Manor Farm," its "correct" name.  This is significant not because of the name, but because it tells us that the animal's situation is no better that it ever was, despite being led through a revolution started by "their own."   They are back exactly where they started; only the power structure on top has changed.  So, perhaps, it's always about power and never about ideas ....

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I assume you are talking about the conference that happens in Chapter 10.  In this conference, Napoleon points out to the neighboring (human) farmers that he has done a number of things that show that his farm is not nearly as radical as they think.  Therefore, he is saying, they should not worry about his farm.  The changes he points out include:

  • The animals no longer call each other "comrade."
  • He has taken down the boar's skull that the animals used to march past on Sundays.
  • He has changed the flag by taking off the hoof and horn
  • He has changed the name of the farm from Animal Farm back to Manor Farm.
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