In the concluding paragraphs of Candide, is Voltaire recommending retreating from social commitment?

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Voltaire seems not to advocate removal from the world, nor disinterest in the larger forces that affect people. However, he does certainly reject Pangloss's approach to philosophy—optimism—and the religious and political debates that seek to impose a meaning on the events that happen in the course on one's life.

Like Voltaire, the text is deeply suspicious of religion and its claims for authority. It is also suspicious of the kind of political thinking that leads to war and tribal allegiance. Only the Anabaptist who lives out his faith of charity toward humanity without seeking to convert or judge others, those in El Dorado who hold wealth and the outside world in contempt, and the Turk Candide encounters at the end seems free of Voltaire's satire. All the other characters engage in acts of cruelty, pettiness, vanity, and division.

The Turk, who offers hospitality and wisdom, speaks for Voltaire, it seems, when he claims that he and his family have found peace and tranquility as well as...

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