Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1978  Can you help me describe the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, including the criteria for listing a drug as...

Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1978

 

Can you help me describe the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, including the criteria for listing a drug as a Schedule 1 - Schedule V controlled substance and give some examples of drugs that are in the Schedule 1 – Schedule V.

Expert Answers
vangoghfan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The act resulted from growing alarm, at the end of the 1960s, about the perceived increase in the use of dangerous drugs. Some opponents of the legislation question the validity of the data used to support the legislation. In any case, the legislation marked a major new commitment by the federal government to the so-called "War of Drugs." The legislation involved new ways of battling drug use, involving an emphasis both on attempted suppression of the drugs themselves and attempted treatment of those addicted to drugs.  A good source about this topic can be found here:

http://books.google.com/books?id=OtC5FjRsE78C&pg=PA64&dq=Comprehensive+Drug+Abuse+Prevention+and+Control+Act+of+1970&hl=en&ei=v0KqTqKHFNS9tgffzaj0Dg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFsQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=Comprehensive%20Drug%20Abuse%20Prevention%20and%20Control%20Act%20of%201970&f=false

brettd eNotes educator| Certified Educator

One controversy about this act is that some argue it was not completely based on science and the criteria the law established.  Marijuana is also included as a Schedule 1 narcotic under the law, and activists challenge that placement by saying it does have medical benefits (given the laws in 15 states regarding medical marijuana), its regulation as medicine in some states, and the scientific disagreement over its addictiveness. So at least part of this law was driven by popular anti-drug sentiment at that time.

accessteacher eNotes educator| Certified Educator

One of the interesting clarifications that is given about Schedule V drugs is that these drugs have "a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States." A huge controversy that continues to rage is the way that marijuana has been shown to help a number of patients suffering from a range of medical conditions, even though they are not "accepted" as part of treatment. This points towards the difficulties in classifying drugs as there is so much disagreement about them.

 

pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Schedule I drugs are those that are deemed to be the most dangerous and the least useful.  These are drugs that

  • Have a high potential for abuse
  • Have no accepted medical use in the US
  • Have no accepted safety protocols for use as medical drugs.

So these are drugs that are seen as quite dangerous.  These include drugs like heroin, LSD, and peyote.

Here's a link that might be helpful.

Karen P.L. Hardison eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Schedule I classifies (with the difficulties mentioned) drugs that are considered readily abused and are NOT already in use for FDA approved medical use. This class includes marijuana and LSD, thus the Schedule covers very different sorts of drugs indeed. Now that some states have approved marijuana for medical use, this Schedule will eventually have to come under some scrutiny and probable revision.

litteacher8 eNotes educator| Certified Educator
Basically, the idea was to pick our battles. Some drugs would be considered worse than others. I do think that the criteria may be specific, as noted above, but there is a certain amount of political leeway in terms of how certain drugs are treated, based on social class for one thing.