What type of equation does the compound formula A= P(1+i)^n turn to if A, i and P are constants.

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In the compound interest formula A = P(1 + i)^n where P is the initial principal, i is the rate of interest per term and n is the number of terms the deposit is maintained for. A gives the amount after n terms.

The values P, i and n are...

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In the compound interest formula A = P(1 + i)^n where P is the initial principal, i is the rate of interest per term and n is the number of terms the deposit is maintained for. A gives the amount after n terms.

The values P, i and n are constants to start with. They are only being used to calculate A.

If A, i and P are constants, the formula can be used to calculate n.

It converts to n = (log A)/(log(1 + i))

If i. A and P are constants in the formula A = P(1 + i)^n, it can be used to determine n or the number the periods the deposit has to be maintained.

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