How would I go about constructing a comparative essay on the two films on Romeo and Juliet?

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think that any comparative essay can be broken down into several distinct parts.  The first would be an opening of sorts that would discuss Shakespeare's work and how it lends itself to being depicted on film.  After this, I think that the focus should be on how the particular scenes that you wish to address are shown in both films.  Where are the differences between Zefferelli's style and Luhrmann's style?  Discuss if you find any differences between each and the particular scene treatment in Shakespeare's text.  I think that addressing the films' specific treatment of elements in the scene such as characterization, music, cinematography, and dialogue can help bring out significant points of similarity and differences.  I think that this is important because you wish to compare both films' treatment of specific scenes.  Placing them against one another will allow this comparison to take place in a full format.  I think that the ending can take a variety of forms.  On one hand and if you are able to, it might be nice to offer up your opinion on the merits of each depiction, or even offer up your own take as to which is better.  I would also address how while cinematic versions do pop up now and then, the text is immortal, and is the source of all interpretation.  This has not changed since its original composition.

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nikkkkk | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

Thankyou so much, this really helps! I don't do too well in English, haha. But I am still struggling abit, I am unsure of what to use for a introduction, because I know we need to state a few things, like the play name, who by, and then introduce that we are doing a comparision on the two films, but because it is an analytical essay, I don't know how to put that into a paragraph :(

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