Comparing the way Wopsle is heckled by the audience with the way Trabbs's boy mimicks Pip, in what ways are the two incidents similar?In Chapter 30 Pip is mocked by Trabb's boy. In chapter 31...

Comparing the way Wopsle is heckled by the audience with the way Trabbs's boy mimicks Pip, in what ways are the two incidents similar?

In Chapter 30 Pip is mocked by Trabb's boy. In chapter 31 Wopsle is heckled by the audience. How are these incidents similar in Great Expectations?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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As Pip struts through his village in Chapter XXX acting the new gentleman that he is, he feels proud of himself until Trabb's boy prostrates himself in the street in mock humility and mimicking Pip in a haught voice, “Don't know yah, don't know yah, 'pon my soul don't know yah!”

Pursuing Pip, Trabb's boy makes crowing sounds, and follows Pip across the bridge.  After he arrives in London again, Pip has a package sent to Joe and then he writes to Mr. Trabb, saying that he cannot be treated in such a way, and

to say that Mr. Pip must decline to deal further with one who could so far forget what he owed to the best interests of society, as to employ a boy who excited Loathing in every respectable mind.

Then, in Chapter XXXI, Pip finds a handbill in his pocket that tells of Mr. Wopsle's--Mr. Waldengarver, as he now calls himself--acting debut as Hamlet.  Pip offers to take Herbert in order to "comfort and abet" Herbert's affairs of the heart.  Once at the theatre, Pip notices how the crowd mocks the affected Wopsle, answering his questions in the "To be or not to be" soliloquy, and shouting at and mocking him when his stockings reveal his white leg, or yelling "wai-ter" as Wopsle waves a handerchief in the graveyard scene. Even Pip and Herbert cannot stiffle their own laughs. 

After the play, however, Mr. Waldengarver appears to have interpreted the mockings another way, telling Pip,

I had the happiness to know you in former times, and the Drama has ever had a claim which has ever been acknowledged, on the noble and the affluent.”

Like Pip, he blames he fails to perceive his own shirtcomings.  When Pip and Herbert flatter him, Mr. Wopsle soaks up their praises in self-delusion. As Pip blames Trabb's boy's outrageous behavior as coming from one who is "a dodging serpent,"  Pip, too, is deluded in not seeing himself as snobbish and putting on airs. Neither Mr. Wopsle nor Pip examine how they have assumed unauthentic appearances and brought the ridicule upon themselves.

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