Compare the two soliloquies in the play Hamlet: 1) Act 1, Scene 2: "O, this too too solid flesh would melt," (lines 131-161)                                    ...

Compare the two soliloquies in the play Hamlet:

1) Act 1, Scene 2: "O, this too too solid flesh would melt," (lines 131-161)

                                    AND

2) Act 3, Scene 1: "To be, or not to be; that is the question:" (lines 64-98).

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The first soliloquy, in Act 1, Scene 2, is characterized by brokenness, short sentences, and exclamations—"Oh God! God!"—which reflect the tortured state of Hamlet's mind. He mourns the fact that "the Everlasting . . . fix'd his canon 'gainst self-slaughter," as the world now seems "flat and unprofitable" to Hamlet, who is feeling suicidal. He bemoans the fact that "so excellent a king" as his father has been apparently forgotten by his mother within "a little month, or ere those shoes were old/With which she follow'd my poor father's body." "O, God!" he repeats several times throughout the soliloquy, and he also breaks off to curse "Fie on't! ah fie!" and to declare, "Frailty, thy name is woman!" Hamlet is here extremely agitated and distressed, and he declares that his uncle is "no more like my father/Than I to Hercules." He concludes by declaring that "it cannot come to good" but vows that "I must hold my tongue."

The second soliloquy in the poem is altogether more measured, lacking...

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