Compare Snowball and Napoleon's techniques for gathering support.

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As was mentioned in the previous post, Snowball and Napoleon have different ways of gathering support from the animals. Snowball is a very eloquent, energetic pig who appeals directly to the animals' imaginations. Snowball's speeches are full of hope for a better future and an easier life on the farm....

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As was mentioned in the previous post, Snowball and Napoleon have different ways of gathering support from the animals. Snowball is a very eloquent, energetic pig who appeals directly to the animals' imaginations. Snowball's speeches are full of hope for a better future and an easier life on the farm. During the assembly meetings, Snowball often wins the support of the majority of animals because of his brilliant speeches. However, Napoleon is better at attracting support in between speeches. Napoleon also finds success by appealing to the sheep. The sheep continually interrupt Snowball's speeches and symbolically represent the masses who were swayed by Stalin's propaganda machine. While Snowball argues for a three-day work week, Napoleon argues for the great need to increase food production. In the end, Napoleon attempts to kill Snowball by sending his ferocious dogs after him during a meeting. Napoleon essentially usurps power and takes over the farm. 

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In Animal Farm, Snowball and Napoleon have very different ways of gathering support from the other animals and this is most evident in Chapter Five during the debates over the windmill. Snowball, for example, gathers support by appealing directly to the other animals. He makes rousing speeches in which he emphasises the potential benefits of having the windmill, particularly as a labour-saving device. We see this in Snowball's "passionate appeal" on the day of the vote:

In glowing sentences he painted a picture of Animal Farm as it might be when sordid labour was lifted from the animals’ backs. His imagination had now run far beyond chaff-cutters and turnip-slicers.

Napoleon, on the other hand, does not try to win over the other animals through public speeches or by appealing to their imagination. In contrast, Napoleon focuses his efforts on "canvassing support for himself" rather than arguing about the windmill. In fact, he seems "almost indifferent" on the day of the vote and he only acts (by setting his dogs on Snowball) when he realises that Snowball's speech has won over the animals. Napoleon, therefore, has no interest in gathering support because he knows that he can use violence to seize power.  

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