Compare and contrast nativist and learning theories of language development. 

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The nativist theory of language acquisition proposes that humans have something in our DNA coding that allows us to understand language. One part of the theory states that the language acquisition device (which is thought to be located in a particular region of the brain) is responsible for our abilities in learning language. Research into brain injuries has revealed that damage in a specific area of the brain affects both the ability to understand language and/or the ability to produce language, depending on the patient. Thus, it seems that communication efforts seem to rely on some functioning area of the brain.

The nativist theory also claims that the core blueprint of all languages is universally the same. When looking at languages across the world, the vast majority are formed in the same basic ways. Almost all use nouns and verbs as foundational ways to communicate information. Although rules of grammar differ from language to language, the basic ways humans link information...

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