Compare and contrast how Mary Warren's character represents being honest and truthful, while Abigail Williams is represented as the devil in The Crucible.

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Certainly, Mary Warren seems more comfortable with the truth than lies, while Abigail possesses an "endless capacity for dissembling ," as Miller tells us in her introduction in act 1. Mary tells Abigail and Mercy, "[...] we've got to tell. Witchery's a hangin' error [...]. We must tell the...

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Certainly, Mary Warren seems more comfortable with the truth than lies, while Abigail possesses an "endless capacity for dissembling," as Miller tells us in her introduction in act 1. Mary tells Abigail and Mercy, "[...] we've got to tell. Witchery's a hangin' error [...]. We must tell the truth [...]!" However, Abigail threatens Mary, and her own cousin, Betty, with a violent death should they "breathe a word, or the edge of a word" about what really went on in the woods the night before. She promises to visit them in the middle of some dark night with "a pointy reckoning" to "make [them] wish [they] had never seen the sun go down!" By the end of the act, Abigail has not only accused Tituba (it seems, in order to deflect negative attention from herself), but she has also "open[ed] [her]self" to Reverend Hale, claiming that she wants to return to Jesus. She seems to have quickly grasped the power of such a claim, and she accuses six other women of witchcraft before the curtain falls on act 1 alone.

In act 3, Mary arrives at the court with John Proctor and his friends, charged to tell the truth to the magistrates: that she did not see spirits or other evidence of witches before, and that the other girls were and still are lying now. She has come to speak the truth, but, ironically, she will not be believed. Instead, Abigail—with her wild tales of a yellow bird she calls "Mary," a bird who she says wants to "tear [her] face" out of envy—will impress the court; Danforth and Hathorne believe her, though she lies. While I wouldn't call her the devil, she certainly seems capable of incredible evil; the more she accuses, the more people are condemned, and the more people die as a result of her lies. In the end of this act, however, Mary is not brave enough to continue to stand up to Abigail, and she turns on John Proctor instead.

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