compare the civil reform of the 1800's to the social reform of todayi dont know what civil reform and social reform is and i cant find it anywhere

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think one way to approach this question is to argue that reforms that begin in the civil sector will lead to reforms in the social sector. For example, the civil reform mentioned above of civil servants being promoted on merit. That can lead to the same idea in the private sector, and eventually in social circles. We can dream.
pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You should really ask your teacher about this because this question doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

Civil reform is a term that generally refers to reforms having to do with government.  Social reform has to do with reforms of social issues.

So, for example, a major civil reform of the 1800s came when the Civil Service was set up in 1883.  That reform made it so that government workers were to be hired on merit, not based on who they knew.  By contrast, a social reform today would be the moves towards allowing more rights to gay people -- it is not a reform having to do with the way government works.  It is a reform having to do with the way society works.

But it doesn't make sense to me to compare these things.  Civil reform and social reform are very different things.

So I think you should check with your teacher to find out what he/she means by civil reforms.  As it is right now, I would not know how to compare the two because they are such different things.  The civil reforms were concerned only with how government worked, not with what it actually did.  The social reforms of today are more geared toward what government does about societal issues like gay rights and abortion.

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