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Compare Cindy Sherman and Annie Leibovitz, discussing their artworks and how they relate to feminism.

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Cindy Sherman and Annie Leibovitz are both American, white, female photographers who started their careers in New York in the 1970s. Many of their works...

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Please note: The post contains numerous questions. The eNotes Homework Help policy allows for one question per post. This answer addresses the first question.

Cindy Sherman and Annie Leibovitz are both American, white, female photographers who started their careers in New York in the 1970s. Many of their works include critical perspectives on inequality in American society, although Sherman’s work tends to be more obviously political and gender-oriented.

Sherman, both in 1954, changed from painting to photography while in college and began professional photography in 1976. Sherman generally appears as a costumed subject, sometimes seeming to impersonate famous women or men in her photographs. Some of them are often modeled after films, advertising, or paintings, while others are based on historical or contemporary events. Originally working in black-and-white, she later changed to color and often uses very large formats. Among her well-known images is “Untitled Film Still #21,” which appears to be an uneasy young woman in New York in the 1950s. Other portraits, such as “Untitled #209” from 1989, evoke Old Master’s paintings while not directly imitating them (http://www.artnet.com/artists/cindy-sherman/untitled-209-oiOGIpPm5u4o5S9ZX-dRrw2).

Leibowitz, born in 1949, graduated from art school and began working as a professional photographer in 1970. As a photojournalist for Rolling Stone, she covered significant political and popular culture events. She became the first woman named chief photographer at the magazine. After moving into portraiture, however, she became well-known, however, for her ability to capture essential qualities of her subjects. Some of her most famous images were featured in Vanity Fair and Vogue, often appearing on the cover. Leibowitz also broke a gender barrier in 1991, as the first woman artist with a solo exhibition at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery.

Among her most notable photographs that became Vanity Fair covers are portraits of two very different women; In 1991, she photographed actress Demi Moore, who was then near term in her pregnancy, wearing only a ring and with her hands covering her breasts and holding her belly. In 2015, she photographed Caitlyn Jenner for the “Introducing Caitlin Jenner” feature that introduced “Caitlyn, the person Bruce has become.”

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