The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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Compare and contrast "Tintern Abbey" to "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" using two characteristics of Romanticism.

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Both poems are about the power of nature, a fundamental characteristic of Romantic literature. In "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," the eponymous mariner is beset by a powerful storm ("the STORM-BLAST came") that chases his ship like a predator. This storm is in turn a punishment for the mariner's killing of the innocent albatross, which constitutes a crime against nature. The moral of the story is perhaps that mankind should be more respectful of the natural world, and the poem also serves as a reminder that man, relative to nature, is weak and insignificant.

In Wordsworth's "Tintern Abbey," nature is presented as powerful in a different way. The natural landscape around the abbey is described as an idyllic place which offers to the speaker a "tranquil restoration" after the "din / Of towns and cities." Whereas nature in "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" has the power to rage against, threaten, and expose the vulnerability of the mariner, nature in "Tintern Abbey" has a palliative...

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