Compare and Contrast the theme of freedom in Brave New World and "Strangers That Came to Town."

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The two works in question show that too much emphasis on conformity limits people's freedom. In "The Strangers that Came to Town," the Duvitches are rejected by the community because they seem different: they are Croatian, they smell bad to their neighbors, and they are poor, which means they dress...

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The two works in question show that too much emphasis on conformity limits people's freedom. In "The Strangers that Came to Town," the Duvitches are rejected by the community because they seem different: they are Croatian, they smell bad to their neighbors, and they are poor, which means they dress like "rag pickers" and eat food, like lard on black bread, that the townspeople find repulsive. The townspeople can't see past their surface appearances to the kindness and generosity of this family. Therefore, the Duvitches lead restricted, isolated lives until the narrator's father decides this is ridiculous and reaches out to them, helping them to gain social acceptance. He learns in the end that although they are different, the Duvitches have more to offer him than he has to offer them.

In Brave New World, people like the Duvitches, who are different, have no possibility to exist. Everyone is test-tube designed and then conditioned from their earliest days to be like everyone else. The society puts such a value on social conformity that nobody has any opportunity to develop any individuality. It is frowned upon as deviant for anybody to be alone or think for themselves: people are expected to live in a state of constant sociality where everyone exists for everyone else.

John the Savage attacks the unfree lives of the citizens of the World State, who live stunted lives because they cannot develop strong relationships based on love, cannot read great literature, do not have access to real religion, and cannot experience suffering. Likewise, Andy's father attacks the shunning of the Duvitches that restricts their opportunities.

The works show that there is a middle ground in social conformity: "The Strangers that Came to Town" asserts that people need acceptance to thrive, while Brave New World, in contrast, argues that people need the leeway to be different. Both works argue that differences can bring richness to a society. When Andy's father realizes how much the Duvitches have to offer, he is enriched, while the World State would be enriched if it allowed the rare people like John the Savage room to be who they are instead of treating them like freaks.

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