Compare and contrast the relationships of Soraya and Amir to their fathers in The Kite Runner. How has their upbringings contributed to these relationships?

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Both Soraya and Amir had powerful, respected fathers who succeeded in Afghanistan and held positions of authority. General Taheri occupied a prestigious position in Afghanistan's military, and Baba was an extremely successful businessman. Both Baba and General Taheri were familiar with Afghan royalty and were proud Pashtuns. Soraya and Amir...

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Both Soraya and Amir had powerful, respected fathers who succeeded in Afghanistan and held positions of authority. General Taheri occupied a prestigious position in Afghanistan's military, and Baba was an extremely successful businessman. Both Baba and General Taheri were familiar with Afghan royalty and were proud Pashtuns. Soraya and Amir also had a difficult time expressing their feelings in front of their fathers and were intimated of them. Both men also fled Afghanistan and immigrated to America, where they had difficulty assimilating. General Taheri and Baba also frequented the Afghan flea market on Saturdays and sold used items while they socialized with other Afghans. As General Taheri and Baba grew old, Soraya and Amir's relationship with them dramatically improved.

While Baba chose to work a lowly job at a service station, General Taheri lived on welfare and refused to work for a living. After immigrating to America, Baba's relationship with Amir improved and he became more tolerant. In contrast, General Taheri experienced upheaval when Soraya ran away with her boyfriend, and he was forced to bring her home at gunpoint. General Taheri is depicted as less tolerant than Baba and even questioned Amir about his decision to bring home a Hazara boy.

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Both of the two fathers in The Kite Runner were high-powered, important men in Afghanistan: Baba was a rich, important businessman, while General Taheri was an important military leader. They both rubbed shoulders with kings. Both were very strict with their children: Amir was never good enough or strong enough for Baba; and when Soraya ran off with her boyfriend, Gen. Taheri tracked her down and took her back home. Both of the men had been relegated to a more common status in the United States, meeting up with each other at the local flea market. Both had made up with their children: Things were never better between Amir and Baba, while Soraya had gotten over her hatred of her father and admitted that he had saved her from a life of drugs. Amir never lived up to Baba's expectations, and because " 'All the Afghans in Virginia were talking' " about Soraya running away, 

"no suitors have knocked on the general's door since."

However, as the children grew into adulthood, their childish ways disappeared and their relationships with their fathers grew stronger. Baba approved of Amir's choice for a bride, and General Taheri seemed pleased that the son of Baba would become his son-in-law. 

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