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Compare and contrast the Mexican government with the United States' government.

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The similarities between the nations' governments are practically all surrounding how the government is run and how it was established. The nations are both democracies, established as federations surrounding a strong central government. They arose from Constitutions that were drafted in order to establish a need to hear the voice of the people.

Additionally, each nation is comprised of various states that hold their own, miniature versions of the federal government. Mexico has 31 states while America has 50; each of these states have significant power over internal governance, but the federal government ultimately takes precedence.

The differences come primarily in structure and some of the activities of the nations. For instance, both Presidents undergo elections to be voted in as leader; however, the American presidential race is decided by the Electoral College while the popular vote decides the winner in Mexico. The Mexican President then directly appoints his cabinet. In America, on the other hand, approval from the Senate is necessary in order for a cabinet member's confirmation. The American President can run for 2 terms, each of 4 years. The Mexican President is restricted to one term, but it is 6 years in length.

There are plenty of other differences, but most of them are relatively minor.

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One of the most intriguing points of comparison between the two systems of government concerns the office of President. Whereas US Presidents are restricted to two four-year terms, their Mexican counterparts can only serve a single six-year term. Once someone has assumed the office of President, they are not allowed to run for the office again, even if they only held the role on a short-term caretaker basis.

This particular provision of the Mexican Constitution was a direct reaction against the presidency of Porfirio Diaz, the foremost political personality of pre-revolutionary Mexico who served as President for a grand total of thirty-one years across seven separate terms of office.

A similar impetus was at work in the framing of the 22nd Amendment to the United States Constitution, which came into effect in 1951. Traditionally it had been customary for the President to serve no more than two four year terms. But the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, which lasted twelve years, upended this long-standing convention. Many believed that it was necessary to go back to the old system, but this time to have it enshrined in law rather than as an unwritten convention.

In the term limits of both the Mexican and the American systems of government, then, we can observe constitutional restrictions on the power of the presidency.

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There are similarities and differences between the US government and Mexico’s government. Both the United States and Mexico’s governments are based on a constitution. The US has had two plans of government while Mexico has had several constitutions, with the most recent one approved in 1917. Both countries have states; the US has 50 states, while Mexico has 31. Both countries are an example of a federal republic. The leader of each country is called a President. The President appoints a Cabinet. Both countries have three branches of government. Political parties exist in both countries.

There are some differences between the United States's government and Mexico’s government. In the US, the Cabinet is appointed by the President and then approved by the Senate. In Mexico, the President appoints the Cabinet without needing the approval of the Senate for all appointees. The US President may serve two terms of four years each. In Mexico, the President serves one term of six years. In Mexico, the President is elected by the popular vote, while the Electoral College elects the President in the United States.

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As indicated above, both governments have a number of similarities and differences. For one, both are divided into three branches; executive, legislative and judicial. Even though these branches are independent, they have a degree of influence in the activities of the other branches. Both governments have a bicameral Congress consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives for the US and a Chamber of Deputies for Mexico. In both governments, the Supreme Court is the highest court operating in the judicial system and justices are appointed to it by the president upon Senate approval.

With regards to differences, a president in the US can only serve for a maximum of two terms each lasting for four years. In Mexico however, a president can only serve for one term lasting six years. In terms of administrative divisions, whereas Mexico has 31 states, the US consists of 50 states. Whereas the president in Mexico can appoint the members of his cabinet without the Senate’s approval except for the case of the attorney general, Head of the Bank of Mexico and senior treasury officials, in the US, all presidential cabinet appointments are pegged on the Senate’s approval. Also, while the president is elected through a popular vote in Mexico, in the US, the president is elected by a college of representatives from each state.

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Both the United States and Mexico have federal governments that are democratically elected and which have separation of powers.  Both have an executive, a bicameral legislature, and a judicial branch.

The most important difference between the two is in how their officials are elected and how long they can stay in office.  In all parts of the Mexican government, there are term limits.  Presidents can serve only one six-year term.  Members of Congress cannot serve consecutive terms.  Members of the Supreme Court get one 15-year term.  In addition, Mexico has a hybrid system for electing its members of Congress.  Some are elected in "first past the post" elections in their districts.  But some are elected by proportional representation.  The US has no proportional representation at the national level.

 

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