Compare and contrast the characters of Daisy and Myrtle in The Great Gatsby. What is Fitzgerald revealing through these similarities and differences?

Compare and contrast the characters of Daisy and Myrtle in The Great Gatsby. What is Fitzgerald revealing through these similarities and differences?

Though Daisy and Myrtle in The Great Gatsby appear vastly different, due to factors such as their differences in classes and backgrounds, they are greatly alike, as is exhibited by their materialism, affairs with other men, dissatisfaction with sharing Tom, toleration of abuse, and more.

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On the surface, Daisy and Myrtle seem very different. Daisy is an ethereal, charming, and delicate woman from a sheltered, well-to-do family. She has the security of being married to Tom Buchanan and his vast wealth. Myrtle comes from the lower classes and is vulgar as well as a full-figured woman. She is married to a gas station owner in the Valley of the Ashes and has little luxury or financial security. In the end, her lack of money means she can be run over and killed with impunity, while Daisy's money saves her from any consequences of the act of running down a woman without stopping.

However, the two women also have much in common. Both are materialists, attracted to Tom for his wealth and what it can offer them. For Myrtle, the attraction is in the material goods and illusion of the high life Tom's money can buy. For Daisy, it is the protection from reality Tom's wealth affords. Both women are dissatisfied with their marriages, and both put up unhappily with sharing Tom with another...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 821 words.)

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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on November 22, 2019