Compare and contrast Sylvia's views to nature in "A White Heron" and Aylmer's views of nature in "The Birthmark."

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There two views of nature are completely different!  Sylvia, first of all, respects and admires nature. She is at one with it and truly is a "child of nature."  She enjoys, respects, and appreciates all of it, from the beautiful scenery to the gorgeous white Heron.  On the other hand, Aylmer...

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There two views of nature are completely different!  Sylvia, first of all, respects and admires nature. She is at one with it and truly is a "child of nature."  She enjoys, respects, and appreciates all of it, from the beautiful scenery to the gorgeous white Heron.  On the other hand, Aylmer is a scientist who is never satisfied with it.  His "nature" is his beautiful wife, Georgia, and when he becomes obsessed with her birthmark, a unique sign of beauty, but one he finds unattractive and distracting, he cannot NOT do something to try to get rid of it and remove the mark of "imperfection," in his eyes.  He SHOULD see the birthmark as a unique sign of Georgia's individual beauty, but he cannot, and in the end, he destroys "nature" when his wife dies after his treatment to get rid of the birthmark.

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