Compare and contrast Expressionism and Surrealism from 1915-1945 .

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Expressionism and surrealism as artistic movements are similar in the fact that both sought to explore the subconscious and the inner workings of an artist's mind. Here is an explanation of the differences between the two artistic movements in terms of visual art.

Expressionism emphasizes the color and the form...

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Expressionism and surrealism as artistic movements are similar in the fact that both sought to explore the subconscious and the inner workings of an artist's mind. Here is an explanation of the differences between the two artistic movements in terms of visual art.

Expressionism emphasizes the color and the form of the artwork, eschewing traditional visual images for shapes that do not depict the real appearance of people or things. Jackson Pollack's splatter technique, for example, depicts the artist's inner world in a non-representational way that is typical of expressionism. While the splatter marks, drips, and dots might not appear like anything recognizable to a viewer, they express what is happening inside Pollack's mind in a symbolic way.

This method of artistic expression is different from the methods that characterize surrealism, which emphasize the fantastical. Surrealist imagery is dreamlike and often very strange and unexpected; for example, elements of objects and situations that exist in real life are observable but they are presented in weird and unusual ways, like Salvador Dali's melting clocks.

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Both Surrealism and Expressionism were international movements in the arts that extended over several different genres, including visual arts, dance, theatre, poetry, and music. Of the two, Expressionism was the earlier movement, starting in the 1890s. The Expressionists were concerned not with faithful representation of external reality but in  making manifest through artistic media internal states, often expressing things that were forbidden (especially sexuality and alienation) in middle class society. Surrealism developed in many ways from Expressionism but was concerned more explicitly with the unconscious and its inherent irrationality. Both movements continued the tendency of the decadents and other fin de siecle movements to delight in shocking the bourgeoisie.

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