Common Core State StandardsThoughts/reflections on the public draft that was released in March? What changes/improvements do you hope to see in the final version (slated to be released later this...

Common Core State Standards

Thoughts/reflections on the public draft that was released in March?

What changes/improvements do you hope to see in the final version (slated to be released later this month)?

How do you anticipate the Common Core State Standards might alter your instruction if they are adopted in your state?

Asked on by copelmat

10 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In some states, the standards are vastly different in focus than the current standards.  Content is introduced at different grade levels and in different sequences, so textbooks will have to be changed.  This is going to be an expensive and time-consuming process, as with the standards movement under No Child Left Behind.  It will be some time before the standards are taken seriously, and even longer before they are implemented.  It's hard to imagine that they will ever be accepted, since educational objectives have historically been the purview of local school boards.  We value local control in this country, and it will be a hard thing to give up.

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I believe having common goals is an effective means to educating an entire body, but it targets the bare minimum. With No Child Left Behind, we raised the bar for being accountable to standards, but have taken our eye off of what the upper half of students can do because we are spending money, time, and tremendous effort to get special populations up to speed with the rest of the group. We are promoting a dumber set of new parents for next generations because of it.

Core standards are good, I like them, but I want to have the time to push every kid to their maximum potential. But in the environment of accountability, I know I have dummied down curriculum to make sure everyone passes. This assessment piece is going to be extremely important.

copelmat's profile pic

copelmat | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

If you take the time to actually look at the public draft of the standards, I think it is pretty clear that the bar of critical and creative thinking is certainly being raised without prescribing "WHAT to think."

In terms of an assessment, that is yet to come; standards must come first. An assessment can only be as strong as the standards which it is designed to measure.

Regardless of our individual opinions on the idea of common standards, it is in all of our best interests to make these standards the very best that they can be. Once a majority of states adopt them, they will begin to drive what all states do in one way or another.

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I agree with post #4.  Why can't we just teach kids how to think and not WHAT to think?  It seems as though we are dumbing down the public when we ought to be making the academic realm a bit tougher.  In my school, we have Star Academy (an alternative school for those who don't want to work hard enough to pass the regular one), Credit Recovery (a computer program that students work through before or after school to make up credits they didn't get in the regular school day/year), and a person who is hired simply to track down kids' assignments who are borderline failure.  What gives?  When I was in school, you worked hard and passed or got the poo knocked out of you.  Now we're allowing re-testing until they've memorized every syllable on the test.  People are more concerned these days with the menu at McDonalds changing than they are an invasion of their rights as a citizen.  UGH.

lrwilliams's profile pic

lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

What ever happened to local control of school districts? First we have State Standards, now we appear to be moving towards a National Standards. I think that accountability is great, however I still believe the local districts should have control over their own districts. I feel we are moving away from that.

brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The adoption of state standards is common across the country, and has largely already taken place in response to the No Child Left Behind era of the last eight years.  The standards aren't the issue, how they are going to measure whether students have me those standards is the problem.  State exams are already being replaced by end of class exams, computer tests and multiple choice questions that are more easily and cheaply graded.  In this case, the recession and budget crunch trumped standards.

hala718's profile pic

hala718 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I actually have not seen the draft but I can see that education has been improving rapidly over the last decades, especially with the technology integrating that is hard to keep up with.

On the other hand I belive that standarizing education should some how be limited to make room for teachers creativity as well as less pressure. Education is education and everyone has a different view of what is right and what is not.

We should focus more on preparing children in this rapidly growing technical world.

swimma-logan's profile pic

swimma-logan | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

I agree with post #4.  Why can't we just teach kids how to think and not WHAT to think?  It seems as though we are dumbing down the public when we ought to be making the academic realm a bit tougher.  In my school, we have Star Academy (an alternative school for those who don't want to work hard enough to pass the regular one), Credit Recovery (a computer program that students work through before or after school to make up credits they didn't get in the regular school day/year), and a person who is hired simply to track down kids' assignments who are borderline failure.  What gives?  When I was in school, you worked hard and passed or got the poo knocked out of you.  Now we're allowing re-testing until they've memorized every syllable on the test.  People are more concerned these days with the menu at McDonalds changing than they are an invasion of their rights as a citizen.  UGH.

I love that quote, teach me how to think, not what. I'm not a teacher, but all students on most levels can see the detremental effects of national standards. Teachers now are teaching to a test, and we're not learning anything valuable that we may actually use. Time is taken up because the government say we need to know topic x....I promise, I don't need to know about topic x...

mlmcdowell's profile pic

mlmcdowell | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I agree with post #4 and post #6!  How are students going to learn how to think if they aren't given that opportunity in school?  By teaching The Test - (whatever it may be - SAT, exit exam, etc.) we are only requiring students to memorize.  Every year it gets worse and worse.  When we study literature, and I ask students to discuss why characters do things or what they would have done in a similar situation, they just look at me.  They have no idea where to start.  Then there are the activities that most students do outside of school - video games, facebook, for example - do not require them to think either.  Another thing that is being affected is that students don't imagine anymore.  I can't imagine (there's the word) not imagining things!  But as long as parents are not concerned, school boards won't be either.  It's all about a grade - not about education.

epollock's profile pic

epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

Though the draft did come out, many schools are getting around compliance due to their own political futures. many states have actually lowered their standards to get around No Child Left Behind and lose government money. The political factors that be will also get around whatever they have to do to not either lose money or power.

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