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Comment on Pope's An Epistle to Dr.Arbuthnot as a typical example of Augustan satire.

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Pope's Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot follows all the conventions of Augustan satire. It is written in heroic couplets of great metrical regularity (the Elizabethan dramatist, for instance, sometimes thinks it a virtue to depart from strict iambic pentameter, the Augustan satirist almost never does). There is a balance to many of the lines that is also typically Augustan, with a caesura between two (often contrasting) descriptive phrases:

A cherub's face, a reptile all the rest;
Beauty that shocks you, parts that none will trust,
Wit that can creep, and pride that licks the dust.
The poem is full of classical allusions and its principal targets are given Latin names. Joseph Addison is comparatively mildly satirized as Atticus but Lord Hervey is savagely attacked as Sporus. Here, the name is indicative of the savagery, since Sporus was a slave boy whom the Emperor Nero was popularly supposed to have castrated and married. As is often the case in Augustan satire, particularly Pope's, the smooth flow...

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