Combine each pair of sentences by changing one of the sentences into a participial phrase.Number one: New England rock formations are like some in Britain. Their similarities intrigue geologists....

Combine each pair of sentences by changing one of the sentences into a participial phrase.

Number one:

New England rock formations are like some in Britain. Their similarities intrigue geologists.

 

Number two:

New foresters learn how to fight forest fires. They observe fires on film.

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samhouston | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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A participle is a verbal that functions as an adjective.  The verb typically has "ing" added to it to become a verbal.  A participle phrase is used to modify a noun.

Number one:

New England rock formations are like some in Britain. Their similarities intrigue geologists.

Change the verb "intrigue" into "intriguing".  Now combine the sentences.

Intriguing geologists with their similarities, New England rock formations are like some in Britain.

Number two:

New foresters learn how to fight forest fires. They observe fires on film.

Change the verb "observe" into "observing".  Now combine the sentences.

New foresters learn how to fight forest fires by observing fires on film.

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